Rescue group holding Zumba fund-raiser, extending adoption special for senior dogs

Maria Wolbert, vice president of the K9 Stray Rescue League, snuggles Otis, an 11-year-old pug mix who’s available for adoption. Senior dogs are $100 to adopt now through the end of December.  Photo by C.J. Carnacchio.
Maria Wolbert, vice president of the K9 Stray Rescue League, snuggles Otis, an 11-year-old pug mix who’s available for adoption. Senior dogs are $100 to adopt now through the end of December. Photo by C.J. Carnacchio.

‘Tis the season for folks to open their hearts and wallets to help the less fortunate.

But not everyone in need has two legs.

Some have four legs and a waggly tail.

The Oxford-based K9 Stray Rescue League is offering two ways to help dogs searching for forever homes.

Folks are invited to attend the group’s Sixth Annual Zumba Holiday Party Fund-raiser on Friday, Dec. 1 from 7-10 p.m. at Warren Woods Baptist Church (14251 E. 12 Mile Rd.) in Warren.

“It’s for anybody who wants to support the cause, have a good time and get a little exercise,” said Maria Wolbert, vice president of the K9 Stray Rescue League.

Admission is $10. That includes refreshments, raffles and prizes, and three hours worth of dance/aerobic activities led by seven Zumba instructors.

“They’re all donating their time,” Wolbert said.

All of the proceeds will be used by the K9 Stray Rescue League to help care for dogs prior to their adoption. This includes checkups with veterinarians, medications, surgeries, food and operating a heated, comfortable, clean kennel facility.

“It’s quite an undertaking to take care of 50 dogs,” Wolbert said.

Founded in 1990, the K9 Stray Rescue League is a state and federally licensed nonprofit group that saves dogs from being euthanized at shelters and accepts those surrendered by owners for various reasons. All dogs are cared for until they’re adopted into permanent homes.

Wolbert noted every dog that comes to the K9 Stray Rescue League receives a fecal test to screen for parasites, viruses and infections.

“People may not understand how crucial that is,” she said.

“There are so many diseases and worms that could cost them their lives if we didn’t do the fecal test and put them on meds (to treat them).”

“We’re the only rescue that does (fecal testing),” Wolbert noted. “That’s what’s extremely unique about us. We will eradicate as many diseases as possible before they leave our doors.”

In addition to fund-raising, the K9 Stray Rescue League is seeking folks willing to adopt seniors – dogs that are at least 8 years old.

During the month of November, the group offered a special on senior dogs. The standard adoption fee of $125 was lowered to $100. (For credit cards, add $10.)

As a result, five seniors were adopted.

“It was wildly successful,” Wolbert said.

The group currently has seven seniors available, so the decision was made to extend the $100 special through the end of December.

Wolbert explained most senior dogs come from homes where they were trained, well cared for and loved for many years.

“Not everybody understands what an amazing package a senior is,” she said.

Senior dogs are typically surrendered to the K9 Stray Rescue League by owners who are no longer able to care for them due to age, health or financial reasons. Sometimes owners give them up because they’re moving to a place that does not allow pets, such as a nursing home, or to a place with no yard, such as a condominium.

“They’re just waiting for another home,” Wolbert said.

Depending on breed, size and health, senior dogs can live another three to five years, according to Wolbert, and they deserve to spend them in places where they’re wanted, needed and happy.

“We don’t want them sitting in a kennel when they could be in a home getting loved,” she said.

For more information about the K9 Stray Rescue League, please visit k9stray.com, check out the group’s Facebook page or call (248) 628-0435.

The kennel facility is located at 2120 Metamora Rd., west of M-24. Hours are 1-4 p.m. on Sunday, Monday and Thursday; 2-5 p.m. Friday; and 12-4 p.m. Saturday.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.